Another Migrating Butterfly, and the Plants that Sustain It

Common Buckeyes have been, well, really common this year.

Common Buckeye drinking nectar from Short-toothed Mountain Mint (Pycnanthemum muticum)

That isn’t the case every year in the areas I frequent near the Delaware River in central New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania.  Common Buckeyes are not year-round residents this far north. They migrate south in late fall to spend the winter in warmer territories, often as far south as Florida.  In migration they can sometimes be seen in large numbers, often moving along the coast in the eastern United States, or sometimes following river valleys.  They migrate north in spring and early summer, sometimes reaching as far north as southern Canada.  Their numbers vary from year to year in these northern locations, becoming increasingly rare the further north they go.

On warm sunny days even in late October, I am still seeing Common Buckeyes often drinking nectar, mostly from flowers that are members of the Aster family.  This family of plants, which includes asters, goldenrods, sunflowers, bonesets, beggar-ticks, and more are typically the most abundant plants blooming in late summer through the end of the growing season.

Common Buckeye nectaring on Aromatic Aster (Symphyotrichum oblongifolium)

Common Buckeyes can also be found basking at ground level, catching the low rays from the late season sun.

Common Buckeye basking

Common Buckeyes frequent open fields, roadsides, gardens, and even beaches, especially where nectar plants are available.

Common Buckeye drinking nectar from goldenrod flowers along the sandy beach at Cape May, New Jersey

Common Buckeyes have a fairly broad geographic range, and have evolved to use a variety of plants as food for their caterpillars, including plantains, figworts,

Lanceleaf Figwort (Scrophularia lanceolata), a caterpillar food plant for Common Buckeye butterflies

gerardia,

Purple Gerardia or Purple False Foxglove (Agalinis purpurea), a caterpillar food plant for Common Buckeye butterflies

Monkey Flower,

Allegheny Monkey Flower (Mimulus ringens), a caterpillar food plant for Common Buckeye butterflies

and Wild Petunia.

Fringeleaf Wild Petunia (Ruellia humilis) a caterpillar food plant for Common Buckeye butterflies

The coloration of the Common Buckeye’s outside hind wing early in the season is mostly tan, with prominent eye spots.

Common Buckeye drinking nectar from Short-toothed Mountain Mint (Pycnanthemum muticum). Note the tan color and eyespots of the hind wing.

The wing color can be quite different in late summer and fall, taking on a rosy hue.  This may be an adaptation that helps Common Buckeyes blend in with the changing color of the surrounding foliage.

Common Buckeye in autumn. Note the rosy color of the hind wing.

Keep an eye out for Common Buckeyes on these last warm days of fall!

Common Buckeyes on goldenrod

 

Resources

Brock, Jim P.; Kauffman, Ken.  Kaufman Field Guide to Butterflies of North America.  2003.

Cech, Rick; Tudor, Guy.  Butterflies of the East Coast.  2005.

Glassberg, Jeffrey.  A Swift Guide to Butterflies of North America.  2012.

Glassberg, Jeffrey.  Butterflies through Binoculars A Field Guide to Butterflies in the Boston-New York-Washington Region.  1993.

Rhoads, Ann Fowler; Block, Timothy A.  The Plants of Pennsylvania.  2007

Wagner, David L.;  Caterpillars of Eastern North America, 2005.

Canadian Biodiversity Information Facility: Butterflies of Canada

Butterflies and Moths of North America

 

 

Cloudless Sulphurs Are on the Move

Very common in the southern United States and Mexico, Cloudless Sulphur butterflies (Phoebis sennae) are much more rare in the northern states and Canada, at least until late in the summer when some individuals pursue their annual dispersal … north?  For the past few weeks I’ve been seeing them at Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve, near New Hope, in the central part of eastern Pennsylvania.

Cloudless Sulphur on Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

Cloudless Sulphur on Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

Look for them flying rapidly while cruising for mates, hunting for caterpillar food plants and laying eggs, or nectaring.  The butterflies I’ve seen have been so busy with the first two activities that I haven’t seen much nectaring.

Cloudless Sulphur laying egg, or ovipositing, on Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

Cloudless Sulphur laying egg, or ovipositing, on Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

Cloudless Sulphur egg on Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

Cloudless Sulphur egg on Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

Cloudless Sulphurs specialize on pea family members, primarily Sennas and closely related plants like Partridge Pea (Chamaecrista fasciculata) and Wild Sensitive-plant (C. nictitans) as food plants for their caterpillars.  At Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve the Cloudless Sulphurs seem to prefer Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa, S. marilandica). Partridge Pea is also available here, although not as plentiful, but I haven’t yet seen them use it as a caterpillar food plant.

Cloudless Sulphur caterpillar on Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

Cloudless Sulphur caterpillar on Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

The caterpillars’ coloration blends perfectly with their food plants, varying from yellow to green.  At this location, their overall green background is an exact match for the color of the Wild Senna leaves on which they’re feeding.  The yellow stripe along the length of the caterpillar’s body resembles the leaf mid-rib, where they can be seen resting or feeding.  This camouflage makes it much harder for a hungry bird to spot them!

Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

The caterpillars may eat the entire compound leaf, including mid-rib

Cloudless Sulphur caterpillar eating leaf midrib of Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

Cloudless Sulphur caterpillar eating leaf midrib of Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

and leaflets.

Cloudless Sulphur caterpillar eating leaflet of Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

Cloudless Sulphur caterpillar eating leaflet of Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

At Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve they are sharing a habitat with Sleepy Orange butterflies, who are usually resident here from July through September, nectaring on a broad variety of flowers, mating, and laying eggs.

Sleepy Orange butterflies, mating

Sleepy Orange butterflies, mating

In the photo below, a Cloudless Sulphur is laying an egg directly opposite a leaf where a Sleepy Orange caterpillar is hiding.

Cloudless Sulphur on Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa) laying egg opposite leaf where a Sleepy Orange caterpillar is hiding

Cloudless Sulphur on Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa) laying egg opposite leaf where a Sleepy Orange caterpillar is hiding

These two butterfly species have a lot in common.  Sleepy Oranges use the same food plants for their caterpillars, and I have so far seen the same preference for Wild Senna rather than Partridge Pea at this location.  Both Cloudless Sulphurs and Sleepy Oranges seem to prefer using younger plants as caterpillar host plants.

Like Sleepy Oranges, Cloudless Sulphurs are primarily a tropical species.  Their range goes as far south as Argentina. In the moderate temperatures of a southern winter, they survive as adults, mostly inactive, but feeding occasionally.  They are somewhat cold tolerant, flying in fairly cool temperatures for butterflies.

But these bright, sprightly butterflies have an adventurer’s genes.  Most years, some individuals move northward, sometimes reaching as far as Ontario province in Canada, in spite of the fact that they can’t currently survive sustained cold winter temperatures. At least, as far as we know, they can’t.

So why do Cloudless Sulphurs keep pushing north every year if they can’t survive sustained periods of cold winter weather?  How is this beneficial to the species’ continued existence?

A species that can subsist over a broad geographic range in diverse habitats is in a better position to survive over time than one that is more narrowly focused.  If something happens to make one part of the range or habitat inhospitable, the species has many other options for locations that will accommodate their continued existance. The larger a species’ population becomes, and the more diverse the environments to which segments of the population are exposed, the more genetic mutations will result in individuals.  If the same genetic mutation occurs frequently enough, it may lead to an evolutionary change in the species.

Cloudless Sulphur laying egg on Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

Cloudless Sulphur laying egg on Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

Cloudless Sulphurs have evolved so that many of those that head north (or their offspring) make a return southward fall migration, spending the winter in a warm southern climate.

But some Cloudless Sulphurs continue to move north in late summer and fall, and probably die when the cold winter sets in.  But two things could happen to make this exploration of new territory a worthwhile effort for the species.  Warming temperatures could eventually make some of this northern territory moderate enough for the Cloudless Sulphurs to survive the winters as they do in the south.  Or a genetic mutation could occur in the Cloudless Sulphurs that leads to an evolutionary change, enabling them to survive a cold northern winter.  Their caterpillar food plants, Wild Sennas, are available to support them as far north as Ontario and all of the northeastern United States.

Cloudless Sulphur laying egg on Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

Cloudless Sulphur laying egg on Wild Senna (Senna hebecarpa)

Resources:

Cech, Rick; Tudor, Guy. Butterflies of the East Coast. 2005.

Glassberg, Jeffrey. Butterflies through Binoculars A Field Guide to Butterflies in the Boston-New York-Washington Region. 1993.

Scott, James A. The Butterflies of North America. 1986.

Wilson, Edward O.  The Social Conquest of Earth.  2013

Butterflies and Moths of North America

Canadian Biodiversity Information Facility

Georgia Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Resources Division

USDA Plants Database