Upcoming Events

Knowing Native Plants: Wildflowers in Winter – In-person and online options available
Sponsored by: Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve
When: Saturday, January 22, 2022  10:00 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Even in winter, native plants can be seen all around us. Join naturalist Mary Anne Borge to learn how to identify the standing winter skeletons of some common native plants, what characteristics to look for, the common types of fruit you might see in winter. The focus will primarily be herbaceous plants. We will also discuss the many benefits native plants offer to both wildlife and your own gardens during the winter months. Some plants even take special advantage of the winter months to photosynthesize. Join us to find out how they do it.
Open to all. Advance registration required. Call the Preserve at 215-862-2924 to register, or register online at BHWP.org.

Knowing Native Plants: Signs of Spring – In-person and online options available
Sponsored by: Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve
When: Saturday, March 26, 2022  10:00 a.m. –  1 p.m. 

As the sun gets higher in the sky and the days get longer and warmer, the subtle sights, sounds and smells of spring begin to emerge. Among the most exciting sights are the first flowers of the spring season. Meet the early flowering plants—including snow trillium, skunk cabbage, hepatica, and some early blooming woody species—and learn how they have adapted to this potentially harsh time of year. We’ll also look at shoots just beginning to poke through the soil, some for spring blooming plants, and others that may surprise you! We’ll talk about some of the signs of spring in the animal world, too.

Indoor presentation followed by an outdoor walk. Online option available. Open to all. Advance registration required. Call the Preserve at 215-862-2924 to register, or register online at BHWP.org.

 

 

3 thoughts on “Upcoming Events

  1. Hi Mary Anne,I have just found your blog & photos & I’m so impressed! I would love to subscribe to your blog. I belong to the F.B. group “Natives of the Northeast” & have become obsessed with natives, which were so numerous, on my 4 acres, in northeast Vermont, when we bought it 24 years ago. I have just about every type of environments, wet/ full sun, damp, shady woods, sandy/dry/full sun, boulders, etc.
    My weak spots are IDing Asters & Goldenrods. Every time I think I’ve learned one or two, I learn more info & doubt myself.
    This past season, I collected seeds from over 40 species, cleaned, labeled & they are now in the back of my frig, for 3 months. Between the prolific natives on my property & sprouting seeds, I’m hoping to start a small native nursery. I retired my original nursery, which was at least 50% native, 10 years ago. I was also a professional gardener/designer for close to 40 years. I turned 70 this year, but I see no reason to slow down, when there are so many nuances to discover.
    I’m so glad to have found you & hope to read as many of your articles as possible. I,ve learn so much from the few I have read. Thanks so much, Lynette Courtney

    • Thanks, Lynette! You should be able to follow my blog by entering your email address where the fill-in for ‘Follow this blog’ is. (Or words to that effect.) Good luck with your nursery! I agree, there is no reason to slow down.

  2. Pingback: Other Native Plant Blogs: The Natural Web | New Moon Nursery

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